Disaster Relief, the Church & the Blogosphere

kinnon —  September 6, 2005 — 2 Comments

Ed Brenegar has become a friend of mine through our blogosphere and email conversations. He is someone for whom I have a great deal of respect. Based in the mountains of North Carolina, Ed works as a business & church leadership consultant, writes a leadership column for the Asheville Citizen-Times newspaper and has also been pastoring a PCUSA church.

Ed has decided to take an active role in helping the Presbyterian Churches who’ve been badly hurt by Katrina. He’s turned his Prebyterianpolis Blog into The Disaster Aid Network: A source for Presbyterians and their churches to create partnerships of aid and support to Presbyterian congregations in need. This may well become a model for other denominations to work with their sister churches who’ve been damaged or destroyed by Katrina and the flooding. Check out what’s happening there – and drop Ed a note if you’d like some direction in how it’s being put together – or drop me a note to help you set up your own Disaster Relief blog.

And if your church hasn’t yet set up a disaster relief response yet, please consider giving to the reputable charities I link to in the sidebar. (Check out what Fellowship Church in Texas is doing as a good example of what you could/should be doing.)

UPDATE: Ed B. responds (in the comments on this post – but I think it’s important enough to include here):

Each one of us has a choice about how we live. We can passively react to situations and live a quiet, peaceful, fairly unremarkable life. Or we can respond by taking initiative to create a positive impact. When a community or a nation is in crisis, our tendency is to think that there is not much I can do. The reality is that most of the institutions that are focused on the crisis can’t do it all. They need individuals and other institutions, like churches, to step forward and take initiative to make a difference. Small organizations can’t do the big stuff, but they can meet highly specialized needs. Don’t wait to be asked, don’t ask for permission. Just start and ask others to join, and figure out how to make it work as you go along.

Let’s all join the effort. I should note that I received an email this weekend from my friend Les Burton who’s leaving Toronto to spend time in Biloxi with TeamGoodness. There are many people who are committing not just money – but their time and energy. God Bless them all. And help us all to be the heroes we are being called to be.

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kinnon

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A television editor, writer & director since 1978. A Christian since 1982. More than a little frustrated with the Church in the West since late in the last millennium.

2 responses to Disaster Relief, the Church & the Blogosphere

  1. Bill,
    Thank you for your kindness.
    What your readers need to know is this.
    Each one of us has a choice about how we live. We can passively react to situations and live a quiet, peaceful, fairly unremarkable life. Or we can respond by taking initiative to create a positive impact. When a community or a nation is in crisis, our tendency is to think that there is not much I can do. The reality is that most of the institutions that are focused on the crisis can’t do it all. They need individuals and other institutions, like churches, to step forward and take initiative to make a difference. Small organizations can’t do the big stuff, but they can meet highly specialized needs. Don’t wait to be asked, don’t ask for permission. Just start and ask others to join, and figure out how to make it work as you go along.
    So, thank you Bill for focusing on this effort.

    Reply
  2. Ed,
    I wrote this in my September Mourning post last week:

    “Three hours south of me by plane, Hell has broken loose. Brute strength with the beautiful name of Katrina brutalized the Gulf. Hundreds, perhaps thousands of lives lost. Amongst the living, its “everyman for himself.” Looting, shooting, pillaging – Death haughtily stalks the streets of New Orleans. Firing bullets at relief helicoptors. Sending salvation back into the sky.

    These third world images make no sense in the first world. How could this be? We are not like them. We are better. More civilized. Our vanity shrinks back from the awful truth. We are all broken human beings in a fallen world. Capable of the worst sins. And yet we ask, in fact demand, “Where are the heroes?” Indeed. Where are we?”

    We are all called to be the heroes in this situation. The government and relief agencies are just as hurt, confused and dispairing as the rest of us – they are all just humans afterall. Our prayers are critical – but as we are the hands and feet of the Body of Christ – we must be involved.

    Thanks Ed.

    Reply

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