I Think Therefore I Blog – I Blog Therefore I Am

kinnon —  March 1, 2006 — 3 Comments

ComputerblogJordon Cooper, Brad Bergfalk & Darryl Dash have all been talking about blogging this week.

Brad says:
Sometimes I think that blogging is simply an intermediary step between our current form of communication and something yet to come (with the rapid pace of change I doubt blogging is the last stop). At other times, I think blogging is a form of catharsis for those who blog and those who read them on a regular basis. Ideas are expressed. Feedback is given. Relationships form and then disappear like the vapor from a tea kettle.
Jordon says:
I wonder if the reason we create these blogs is not so much to fulfill the promise of personal publishing but as an online place to hang out on a front porch. Maybe that’s why so many people keep showing up and posting, we have loyalty to our community and our readers. <snip> We keep showing up everyday because we know that everyone else does and it makes us feel a little less alone.
Darry, commenting on Jordon’s post:
I was reading a review of the new iLife last week, and it said that software has now made it possible for anyone to bore the rest of the world. In a way that’s true, and many of the blogs I read (and write) are sort of boring in the same way that most of my conversations are boring. But they serve a bigger purpose, in that some of my strongest relationships today have been built over a series of relatively boring conversations.

I began blogging because I wanted to change the world… or one person’s mind. I’m still waiting…

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kinnon

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A television editor, writer & director since 1978. A Christian since 1982. More than a little frustrated with the Church in the West since late in the last millennium.

3 responses to I Think Therefore I Blog – I Blog Therefore I Am

  1. I don’t know. You haven’t convinced me. 😉

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  2. Sometimes if feels like CB radios with keyboards and less redneck. Are we discovering yet again that we are social beings? Maybe the ultimate disruptive technology is a human conversation?

    Breaker! Breaker!

    Reply
  3. I like the front porch metaphor. Growing up, my sister and I spent countless hours on the front stoop of our house watching the world go by. When the town laid fresh sidewalks we carved our names right at the base of the stoop. Blogs remind me of that. They give us our very own stoops from which to observe and, if we choose, engage. Unlike message boards and chat rooms, our blogs make us feel safe and comfortable because they are our domain and we are in control of the content and interactions. At least, that’s why this blogger likes ’em!

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What do you think?