Liam on Philip Pullman

kinnon —  November 7, 2007 — 1 Comment

Liam has written a good post on Philip Pullman and his Dark Materials trilogy, one of which is about to be released as a movie. (He reveals a few of my fundegelical roots in the post…but, hey, I am human. And humans can change.)

UPDATE: Ben Witherington weighs in with his own commentary on the movie.

kinnon

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A television editor, writer & director since 1978. A Christian since 1982. More than a little frustrated with the Church in the West since late in the last millennium.

One response to Liam on Philip Pullman

  1. Hi Bill (and Liam). The August 07 issue of (UK) “Literary Review” had a interview with Pullman. Currently available online. Here’s an excerpt. I agree with Pullman’s perspective and said as much on my blog.

    Question – “How much trouble did the project encounter in America as a result of your book’s perceived anti-Christian bias?

    Response – The problem for those who think there’s an anti-religious anti-moral bias in the books comes when they haven’t actually read the books: of course there’s a criticism of organised theocratic tyrannical religion but who can disagree with that?

    A review in the Church Times said, ‘When the morality is secure the metaphysics don’t matter.’
    The qualities which my books criticise are intolerance, fanaticism, cruelty, and the qualities they celebrate are love, kindness, openness, curiosity. I think the moral majority in America is not a majority at all and that the power of the organised Christian Right is a phantom.

    Theocracies don’t have to be religious. Soviet Russia was a theocracy. They had a holy book, which was Marx; they had prophets and doctors of the church (Lenin, Engels, Stalin, and so on); they had a priesthood that had privileges and powers above the ordinary, which was the Communist Party. There was also a teleological view of history and you could either be on the side of history or against history. There was a state apparatus of denunciation, betrayal, punishment, the idea of heresy, even the cult of holy relics – so many parallels…”

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