Consumerism, the Very Air We Breath

kinnon —  December 14, 2008 — 3 Comments

BWIII and others have pointed at this NYT article on the growth of Evangelical Churches during an economic downturn. The highlighted line below, stood out for me,

But why the evangelical churches seem to thrive especially in hard times is a Rorschach test of perspective.

For some evangelicals, the answer is obvious. ”We have the greatest product on earth,” said the Rev. Steve Tomlinson, senior pastor of the Shelter Rock Church.

Buddy_christ-smlr.jpg

That’s right folks. You may not be able to get that new Bimmer, Lexus or even a Ford Focus, but Jesus is always available.

In fact, HE’S FREE! Call 1-800-free-Jesus. Operators are standing by!

How much better a deal can you get than that. Especially when money is tight. Call now and buy JESUS! And if you call right now, we’ll also send you this limited time offer of a lovely vial of anointing olive oil. Guaranteed to heal.

Or.

At least make your salad better.

kinnon

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A television editor, writer & director since 1978. A Christian since 1982. More than a little frustrated with the Church in the West since late in the last millennium.

3 responses to Consumerism, the Very Air We Breath

  1. love the picture of buddy Christ…great quote you bring out…i read this article today and thought, “interesting. weird. why is the TImes reporting on this?”

    Reply
  2. Bill, did you see this over at Al and Deb’s personal page?

    link to theforgottenways.org

    Reply
  3. From the article:

    Many ministers have for the moment jettisoned standard sermons on marriage and the Beatitudes to preach instead about the theological meaning of the downturn.

    I get confused when I read things like this. Last time I was out of work, people in my church gave my family meals, and others got me in contact with companies that were hiring. I didn’t need a sermon on ‘the theological meaning of the downturn’ – I needed help!

    And if you’re going to preach about the economy, then why on earth would you jettison the Beatitudes? Is “blessed are the poor” too touchy a subject to handle?

    Reply

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