Theological Education in the 21st Century

kinnon —  October 14, 2010 — 3 Comments

In this second video, Gary Nelson, President of Tyndale University College & Seminary and Dave Fitch, Associate Professor of Evangelical Theology at Northern Seminary talk about what theological education looks like now and what it needs to look like. And that theological education is not simply for full-time seminarians, nor is it to simply to create full-time ministers, missionaries or other paid church staff.

Nelson/Fitch – Theological Education in the 21st Century from Bill Kinnon on Vimeo.

Please note that missonally-focused videos shot & produced by myself and Imbi Medri-Kinnon are available at the Missional Channel on Vimeo. You can also grab the Widget for this channel from the right hand column of this blog under Missional Videos and place it on your blog or website.

kinnon

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A television editor, writer & director since 1978. A Christian since 1982. More than a little frustrated with the Church in the West since late in the last millennium.

3 responses to Theological Education in the 21st Century

  1. Great dialogue. I think one of the big challenges is how to make this change work well in the transition, in this liminal time. For many who are daring to approach missional formation differently, it can be more difficult and costly than it should. However, I believe it is worth it.

    Thanks again for sharing such amazing conversation!

  2. One of the steps in that transitional period ought to be a different hiring system in the seminaries. If they can bring in people who are not just academically qualified but also bring with them a wealth of experience from a secular job, this would already be an enormous leap forward.

    And instead of a church internship, students could be required to spend a minimum amount of hours every month in some type of engagement with the community – which in turn could be part of a course where the questions and challenges from that experience would have to be tackled by the lecturer as well as the student.

    Eventually the question will need to be asked whether the current seminary model is sustainable and needs to make way for multivocational teachers who take a small group of students under their wing rather than the strict classroom model we have now.

  3. Josh,
    Methinks you are on to something. I think we need to rethink seminary completely. More on this to come from me.

What do you think?